The Coaching Effect Blog

The Coaching Effect: Manager Metrics Every Leader Should Be Measuring

Posted by Bill Eckstrom

March 9, 2020

(Adapted from "The Coaching Effect" book.)

If you're a leader you know that "coaching" has always been considered a soft skill, and what differentiates a soft skill from a hard skill is measurability. The way one dresses, their executive presence, social graces, voice intonation, body language, and so on are soft skills because they are not measured nor correlated to performance.

Coaching, however,  no longer fits that definition since it can now be measured and correlated to decreases or increases in performance. For example, when EcSell Institute measures how often a coach does joint work with sales people, how often they have a career discussion, how often they provide feedback, how often they are holding one-to-one meetings, and how effective they are at all those activities, we can then correlate them to performance and draw fact-based conclusions on coaching effectiveness. More on this here

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Topics: Performance Tracking/Analytics, Performance Equation, Assessment Tools, The Coaching Effect, Building Relationships

Measuring Manager Effectiveness Isn't For the Faint of Heart

Posted by Bill Eckstrom

February 12, 2020

In a previous blog, I went in depth on the topic of what makes some managers more effective than others.  The reason we're able to confidently state our findings is because we have the ability to measure the effectiveness managers have on their team members and team performance through The Coaching Effect Survey

Data that measures employee effectiveness is by no means new, especially in sales, where many companies track most every selling activity imaginable through tools such as customer relationship management (CRM)  systems. However, consider the following exchange and think if it applies to your company.

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Topics: Performance Tracking/Analytics, Assessment Tools

Do more and meet less

Posted by Sarah Wirth

October 10, 2013

“Work expands so as to fill the time available for its completion.”  This adage was first
written by Cyril Northcote Parkinson in a 1955 essay, so it has come to be known as Parkinson’s Law.  It’s a relatively simple concept – that work will take as long as you allow it to take
– but one that is profound when you consider how true it is.  And I don’t think that there is any activity where Parkinson’s Law is more evident than business meetings. 

We all know the grind of having a calendar full of meetings.  There are so many important things on our to do lists – coaching our reps, responding to customer needs, putting together plans to grow our sales, etc. – that the last thing many of us want to do is sit through yet another hour long meeting.  Typically, that’s not because the information shared or things  discussed in business meeting are unimportant.  On the contrary, the content shared is typically very relevant to us and our work.  No, what frustrates us and makes us dread the meeting is that we also know that much of the time will be wasted on unnecessary discussions, debates and redundant information. Meetings per se are not bad, but how they are conducted often is.

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Topics: New to Leadership, Performance Reviews, Sales Motivation, Professional Development Ideas, Assessment Tools, Time Management

How To Keep Your Talent Pool Full. A Recruiting Process.

Posted by Kristi Shoemaker

April 10, 2012

Ask yourself this question: When do you start recruiting your next sales producer? In many instances, sales managers wait until there is a vacancy and then embark on a crazy, mad dash to fill the spot.  Clearly, this isn't the best process. Rather, recruiting should be an ongoing process that everyone on the team is responsible for.

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Topics: Assessment Tools

Sales Team Talent: Can Be Acquired By Hope or By Plan

Posted by Bill Eckstrom

March 7, 2012

When asked which of the EcSell Institute’s 6 Pillars is most critical to sales team success, 97% of executive sales managers from across the country indicate the Identification and Acquisition of Talent as “extremely important” or “important”.  No big surprise.

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Topics: Assessment Tools, Talent Identification/Acquisition

Through The Eyes of The Sales Rep, Part 1

Posted by Bill Eckstrom

August 10, 2011

Though at times it may not seem this way, healthcare has always been interested in improving the care provided to patients, but what is interesting is defining what "care" means to the parties involved and what is most important to improving that "care". For many years healthcare turned to doctors, nurses and administration, those providing the "care" to determine how it could be improved. Hmmm, did anyone ever think to involve the patient and get their opinion? Did anyone think to evaluate what was important through their eyes?

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Topics: Assessment Tools

4 Hiring Mistakes to Avoid

Posted by Kristi Shoemaker

May 30, 2011

We found this article, written by Tom Harnish, very relevant to sales managers. How challenging is it to hire a sales person who is clearly "selling himself" to you? How do you know if he/she is being real? These four hiring strategies can help you avoid making a bad hire.

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Topics: Assessment Tools

Client satisfaction DOES NOT EQUAL Loyalty!

Posted by Kristi Shoemaker

April 7, 2011

EcSELL Institute Sales Coaching Summit Session Summary

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Topics: Assessment Tools

How to increase close rates w/ ZEBRAs not ZONKEYs

Posted by Kristi Shoemaker

April 6, 2011

EcSELL Institute 6 Pillars of Sales Productivity Pre-Summit Workshop Session Overview

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Topics: Sales Process, Assessment Tools

Sales Management Lesson from Google

Posted by Bill Eckstrom

March 16, 2011

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Topics: Professional Development Ideas, Assessment Tools

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