The Coaching Effect Blog

The Complete Coach

Posted by Bill Eckstrom

September 8, 2016

When we interviewed I told them it might be challenging for me from an emotional perspective and it was. Two times that day I was challenged to maintain composure.

Sometime ago, Aspen, our Yellow Labrador, and I started the journey to do animal therapy. She seemed predisposed to this type of work due to her gentle soul and disposition. She is a happy, docile retriever who acts indifferently in the presence of other dogs, but her tail never stops when around people. So, Maddie, my youngest daughter, and I did all the appropriate training, took the classes, tested, applied for and were approved to take Aspen into nursing homes, hospitals, schools, etc. Due to Aspen’s acumen in the outdoors, I knew she was highly trainable and she again proved her intelligence by passing each drill on the first attempt.

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Topics: Emotional Intelligence, High performance coach

11 Tips To Manage Millennials

Posted by Kristi Shoemaker

September 21, 2011

The millennials joining your sales department now were born between 1980 and 2000. Unlike the Gen-Xers and the Boomers, the Millennials have developed work characteristics and tendencies from doting parents, structured lives, and contact with diverse people. Author of About.com Guide shares 11 tips to manage your millennial sales people.

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Topics: Emotional Intelligence, sales management skills

How to Give Your Sales Team an Olympic Edge

Posted by Kristi Shoemaker

April 8, 2011

 

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Topics: EcSELL Institute Partner, Emotional Intelligence, Sales Coaching Summit, sales coaching, sales performance

Emotional Intelligence on the Sales Team

Posted by Jaime Davis-Thomas

December 22, 2010

Emotional Intelligence on the Sales Team

Jaime Davis-Thomas, EcSELL Institute Director of Research & Publications

Emotional intelligence involves “the intelligent use of emotions: you intentionally make your emotions work for you by using them to help guide your behavior and thinking in ways that enhance your results” (Weisinger, 1998).

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Topics: sales producer, Career Development, sales management research, collaborative leadership, Emotional Intelligence, sales leadership, sales coaching, sales rep peformance, EcSELL Institute, Pillars, coaching, professional development, assessment tools

Mothers would make great Sales Managers

Posted by Kristi Shoemaker

November 8, 2010

Posted by Kristi Shoemaker

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Topics: Emotional Intelligence, coaching, ideas for sales leaders

5 Fundamental Attributes of Effective, Happy Sales Leaders

Posted by Jaime Davis-Thomas

October 6, 2010

5 Fundamental Attributes of Effective, Happy Sales Leaders

By Jaime Davis-Thomas, Director of Research & Publications, EcSELL Institute

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Topics: EcSELL Institute Partner, Engagement, sales results, Emotional Intelligence, Research, Accountability Coaching, sales management webinar, ROI, Leadership & Management, collaboration, Wisdom, Strengths

How to bridge generation gaps btwn sales managers & sales reps

Posted by Jaime Davis-Thomas

July 30, 2010

The Big Disconnect – Managing the Generation Gap

Guest Author: JP Pawliw-Fry, Institute for Health & Human Performance 

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Topics: EcSELL Institute Partner, Emotional Intelligence, sales coaching, sales management skills, sales management resources

Collaborative Leadership in Sales Management

Posted by Jaime Davis-Thomas

July 30, 2010

Posted by: Jaime Davis-Thomas, Research Leader, EcSELL Institute

You've probably heard of the concept "Collaborative Leadership", but are you aware how it can transform your sales organization? Keep reading.

Collaborative Leadership Defined

  • It is leadership shown by a group that is acting collaboratively to solve agreed upon issues.
  • It uses supportive and inclusive methods to ensure that all people affected by a decision are part of the change process.
  • It requires a new notion of power...the more power we share, the more power we have to use [1]

Benefits of Collaborative Leadership

  • Buy-in.  Collaborative leadership encourages ownership of the enterprise, whether it's a coalition, an organization, a business, or a community project. By involving everyone in decision making and problem solving, it makes what people are doing theirs, rather than something imposed on them by someone else. The sense of ownership builds commitment to the common purpose.

  • More involvement in implementation. Members of a collaborative group are more likely to be willing to take responsibility for implementing the group's action plan, because they were part of developing it.

  • Builds TrustCollaborative leadership, by its use of an open process and its encouragement of discussion and dialogue, builds trust among those involved in the enterprise.

  • Elimination of turf issues. Similarly, collaborative leadership can help to address turf issues through establishing mutual trust, making sure everyone's concerns are heard, and helping organizations, factions, or individuals find common ground and work together.
  • Access to more and better information and ideas. When all involved in an issue are party to addressing it, they bring with them a wealth of information, as well as a variety of perspectives. As a result, the solutions they arrive at are likely to be better than those developed in a vacuum, or by only a small number of people.

  • Better opportunity for substantive results. The combination of ownership of the process and its results, trust, real collaboration, and better planning yields real success in the real world. In looking at successful community development efforts, Chrislip and Larson [2] found that nearly all were characterized by collaborative leadership.

  • Modeling new leaders. Collaborative leadership helps to train new leaders from within the group, thus assuring continuity and commitment to the issues the group is addressing.

  • Stakeholder empowerment. The inclusion of all stakeholders - anyone with an interest or involvement in an issue or organization - in problem-solving and decision-making not only prepares potential leaders, but leads to people taking more responsibility and caring more about what they do. It leads to better functioning in every sphere.

  • Fundamental change for the better in the ways organizations operate. Collaborative leadership breeds more collaborative leadership and more collaboration, leading to a different way of looking at solving problems. This in turn brings more willingness to find common ground and common cause with others, more willingness to tackle new issues, and more effective and wide-reaching solutions. [2].

Key Lessons for Leaders

There have been a number of research projects and reviews of key lessons for Collaborative leaders but they all come down to some similar themes. Madeleine Carter, writing for the Center for Effective Public Policy as part of research project funded by the United States Department of Justice and State Justice Institute, defines five qualities of a collaborative leader:

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Topics: Engagement, collaborative leadership, Emotional Intelligence, sales leadership, sales team, Leadership & Management, Executives, Sales Management, collaboration

ROI of Emotional Intelligence & Impact on Sales Team Accountability

Posted by Kristi Shoemaker

July 28, 2010

Posted by: Kristi Shoemaker, Marketing, EcSELL Institute

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Topics: Emotional Intelligence, Accountability Coaching, Sales Management Summit

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